The Brightest Star

christmas-122Like usual, approaching this Holiday season requires strength, stamina, and endurance, just to get done all of the things that need to get done.  If you aren’t feeling  pulled in a million different directions, you are indeed one of the very few.  All of the preparation isn’t necessarily a bad thing – in fact, decorating, finding gifts to give, sending cards, meeting with friends – these are all part of what makes this time of year fun.  However, if you are like me – one of the things that rarely happens but should happen – is carving out a bit of time to be alone.  It is with that thought in mind, might I suggest this exercise.

Late one night or very early one morning – go to where the skies are dark and it is quiet.  Still your mind from all distractions and find the brightest star in the sky.

“Star of wonder, star of night, star with royal beauty bright.  Westward leading, still proceeding, guide us to thy perfect light.”

Long ago, the bright light of one star led three wise men to what they were seeking.  Those three men have come and gone, but that bright star still shines.  It is when we are alone in the quiet of those moments that the perfect light of that star can lead us to a place of  peace, joy, and love – God’s gift to each and every one of us.  Merry Christmas, everyone.

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Never

With the Thanksgiving Holiday right around the corner, the thought that has stayed with me the past few days is this – we can never be too thankful.  Regardless of what situation we may find ourselves in – what the circumstances are – if we are willing to look beyond ourselves, there are always things to be thankful for.

Choosing to give thought to what those are can be a double blessing.  To make your own heart a little happier the next few days and at the same time, to make someone else’s heart happier – DO THIS:

Think about someone in your life, past or present, who remains special to you.  Could be a family member, a teacher, a neighbor, a friend, a co-worker, a teammate, a coach – someone who has made your life better or touched something in you just by being who they are.  When you have identified that person – think about how they have affected you and the qualities about them that you are so grateful they have.

Now comes the most important part.  Write and tell them.  Sharing your gratitude by writing a card or a letter will not only make you happier – it will make the person receiving it happier, as well.

The end result of gratitude is that it inspires us to share it with others.  To pass it along this Thanksgiving Holiday may just mean more than ever.

 

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This is my Mom. For decades she prepared a Sunday afternoon meal for her kids, her grandkids, and her great grandkids.  We gathered each week to  escape from daily life, eat well, and feel loved.  Thanks, Mom.  Your family adores you.

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The Man

The Man in the Arena.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”       Theodore Roosevelt April 23, 1910

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Element

img_5512A couple weekends ago at one of our Special Olympics bowling competitions I was talking with a volunteer who had never seen our athletes bowl before.  I asked him what he thought and his answer was immediate – “Boy, they are really in their element here.”  I didn’t have to wonder what he meant.

To fully appreciate being in your element, you have to consider what it’s like when you are not.  My first prom was a great personal example.  My mom took me to a salon to have my hair done.  I left looking like someone else.  I had to buy high heels – which required a balancing act just to walk.  This was not normal for me.  And – I had to find a long dress – one that went all the way to my ankles.  By the time my date and I got to the dance, I had already figured out that the chances of moving my entire body to a fast paced beat without my hair falling, my ankles breaking, and my legs getting tangled was probably slim to none.  As we walked into the prom – I remember feeling like a duck out of water.  I felt uncomfortable and didn’t really want to be there.

On the flip side – being in one’s “element” can be one of the best things, ever.  Doing something you like to do in an environment that suits you can lead to all kinds of possibilities.  Just like anyone else, when our Special Olympics athletes are in that situation – they are wildly happy and actually captivating in their own unique way.  Considering the way most of them go through life – teased, not included, and over-all undervalued – how great is it that Special Olympics exists.

 

 

 

 

 

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Audit

The other day I was asked this question – “If Special Olympics New Mexico were to go through an audit to determine its greatest value, what would you say that would be?”  If you are reading this, take a moment and answer that question for yourself.

I believe our greatest value at every level of our organization and in every community we are in – is our RELATIONSHIPS.

We are an organization of mutually beneficial relationships built on the very core of how our athletes go through life – treating other people like we all hope to be treated.

When I think of my own list of valued relationships, I think of our Special Olympics athletes and their family members, who have opened my eyes and heart to see and feel more; our staff, Board of Directors  and Area Directors who whole-heartedly commit to our vision and mission; the long list of coaches and chaperones who tirelessly give of time they don’t really have to make our athletes better and keep them safe; the people who represent the businesses and civic organizations who value what our athletes bring to society; the volunteers who show up to help ensure a quality Games or fundraising event; the teachers and school administrators along with the regular education students who make school a place of acceptance and friendship; the health professionals who screen our athletes to make sure they are able to participate in the best health possible; the law enforcement officers and their families who support our athletes by raising money and awareness for Special Olympics through the Torch Run; the donors whose hearts are moved to give because they know they can help make a difference; the intercollegiate and high school coaches, athletes, and officials who stand with us in the power of sport that changes lives; and lastly, the government officials who fight for the rights of those with intellectual disabilities because they know it’s the right thing to do.

This isn’t just an arbitrary list of groups who work with Special Olympics in some capacity.  Each category brings to mind some of the nicest and best people I’ve ever known.  Relationships like these make hard days easier, good days even better, and every day life more meaningful.

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What they did

Decades ago two individuals envisioned a better life for people with intellectual disabilities- Eunice Kennedy Shriver and Richard LaMunyon.  This Saturday the world will celebrate EKS Day – a day dedicated to Mrs. Shriver, founder of the Special Olympics movement.  A week ago law enforcement officers and Special Olympics representatives celebrated Retired Police Chief Richard LaMunyon, founder of the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics.

Mrs. Shriver saw first hand the terrible treatment of people with intellectual disabilities.  She saw the struggles of her own sister and witnessed the indescribable human suffering of those hidden away in institutions across our country and around the world.  Eunice moved from anger to the creation of Camp Shriver – where in her own back yard boys and girls with intellectual disabilities were invited to come, play games, and have fun.  Fast forward to today – over 4.7 million people with intellectual disabilities from 169 countries are training and competing in Special Olympics sports.

In 1981, Richard LaMunyon, Chief of Police in Wichita, Kansas, volunteered for the local Special Olympics Games.  He saw a great need being served with very little resources.  He also saw what Special Olympics not only brought to the athletes but to the volunteers and organizers who were at the Games.  The Chief took five of his officers and by running the Olympic Torch, they committed to raising money and awareness for Special Olympics.  Fast forward to today – this past year 97,000 law enforcement officers from around the world raised $55,354,258 for Special Olympics.

Here are my thoughts.  Both Eunice Kennedy Shriver and Chief Richard LaMunyon not only had opinions about the darkness going on in the world around them – they had an idea they believed would bring light.  They didn’t just talk about what they felt needed to change – it was what they DID that changed the lives of millions of people then and now.

It feels like today a lot of us are just talking, when maybe, just one idea followed by an action could bring light to the darkness.

 

 

 

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Tees

nmteeIf you are involved in Special Olympics or have been for any length of time, my guess is you probably have a t-shirt that proves it.  In fact, I would bet that most of us in Special Olympics New Mexico have stacks of Games and Event t-shirts that we have collected over the years.  This past weekend our Four Corners Invitational shirt was a hit, and I believe this is why.

There is an entire psychology on what our clothes say about us.  It relates to establishing and maintaining a sense of who we are, where we fit in, and where we belong.

Over 1800 people left our Four Corner’s Invitational sporting a t-shirt that sent this message to those around them – “I am Special Olympics – I am New Mexico – and I am proud of it.”

 

 

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